Kiril Prashkov

Kiril Prashkov
Konuşan Kaldırım Taşları
1997-2003
On beş kaldırım taşı üzerine yağlıboya
12 x 12 x 12 cm (yak., her biri)
Sanatçının izniyle
Fotoğraf: Kiril Prashkov

Our “Cold Front from the Balkans” exhibition focuses on different generations of artists and art groups from the Balkan region. Throughout the exhibition, we keep sharing detailed information about the artworks. Take a look at Kiril Prashkov’s “Speaking Cobble Stones”.

Kiril Prashkov Konuşan Kaldırım Taşları 1997-2003 On beş kaldırım taşı üzerine yağlıboya 12 x 12 x 12 cm (yak., her biri) Sanatçının izniyle Fotoğraf: Kiril Prashkov

Kırıl Prashkov
Speaking Cobble Stones
1997-2003
Oıl on 15 cobble stones
12 x 12 x 12 cm (c. each)
Courtesy of the artıst
Photo: Kırıl Prashkov

Texts:
I’m 100% European, only my surface is Balkan
I was wrapped in a love letter to a certain Jeanne-Claude
In Budapest I hit a Russian Soldier in 1848 and a Soviet one in 1956
I was shaped as Buddha when Alexander made me come to Macedonia
A Serb threw me on a Bulgarian, the Bulgarian on a Greek, etc
Just some centuries ago I was covered with hieroglyphs
Not that I’m anti-French but I prefer bare feet to Michelin
I was the one who helped Archimedes with his principle
Juliet climbed on me to kiss Romeo
I still remember the step of the first Marathon runner
I came in Europe by mistake with the first potatoes from Peru
Ceausescu first stood & then lay on me
Three sides of me are Muslim, one is Catholic & two are Orthodox Christian
It was a long journey from Byzantium via Constantinople to Istanbul
Once Onan threw his semen all over me

Is the cobble stone an interactive media? Well, for sure! It is not a mistake to claim that the cobble stone is quintessential to the Stone Age. And besides, it is the most urban stone – a step along the path of civilization; a sign that knee-deep mud is not our thing. The one who puts down cobble stones is a good man; their destroyer is not. The cobble stone is a regulated stone; it has ancient stability and it has endured the test of feet and wheels. It is itself a kind of labor which supports movement. It may also work as a weapon, mostly of the proletariat. If you take it in your hand to feel its weight then you can actually learn something. It contains the excesses of the past; and it is able to hold it all together – very much like in the Balkans. That is why the cobble stone if often replaced by asphalt.

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