Dimitrije Bašičević

cografya
cografya

DIMITRIJE BAŠIČEVIĆ – MANGELOS
MANIFEST VLAŠKOVULIČANSKI
1977-1978
ACRYLIC ON GLOBE
40 X 25 CM (C.)
COURTESY OF MODERNA GALERIJA / MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, LJUBLJANA

Our “Cold Front from the Balkans” exhibition focuses on different generations of artists and art groups from the Balkan region. Throughout the exhibition, we keep sharing detailed information about the artworks. Take a look at Dimitrije Bašičević’s Manifest vlaškovuličanski” video installation.

Dimitrije Bašičević was an art historian, critic and curator. Gradually, though, he became engaged in a very personal form of art, and as an artist he took the name Mangelos. Actually he called his activity noart; from small patches of ink in his school exercise books, which marked deaths of people he knew during World War II, he developed monochrome surfaces, paysages of war and death. But these black surfaces also formed an empty space, a tabula rasa, which offered the opportunity to develop a new, strongly and rationally based line of thought.

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Later Mangelos also began to use school globes, which he painted and used as “empty boards”. On such surfaces, he wrote numerous manifestos, which reveal his broad interest in traditional and contemporary thoughts. The main theme of his work was the demand that modern, functional thought, which is best expressed in language, should replace the traditional metaphorical way of thinking which characterises the art tradition from ancient times to Picasso. Gradually his manifestos became shorter, condensed, pithy, “super-Wittengensteinian”, as he called them. Still, there is an obvious paradox in his work, in the complex, contradictory, and poetic nature of his multi-layered art –while he demanded a functional approach, his own work remained basically manual, and its appearance archaic. His manifestos remind one of old exercise books or even illustrated manuscripts.
Moderna galerija

Cold Front From the Balkans” exhibition can be visited until 7 May at Pera Museum!

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